26_10h30_70 Biomass and chemical composition of Musca domestica L. 1758 maggots breed on different feeding substrates…






As the need for high-quality and innovative chicken feed in Niger is increasing rapidly, the objective of this work was to investigate the potential of maggot production on locally available byproducts as a novel feed for poultry. Eight substrates (cow manure; cow rumen content; sorghum stem residue; millet glume; rice husk; brewer’s grains; millet bran and wheat bran) were selected due to their open and easy access in the agricultural environment of Niamey. To test these monodiets, Musca domestica eggs were obtained from a M. domestica breeding unit set up at the university of Abdou Moumouni. Each diet (n = 3) was inoculated with 0.01 g of M. domestica eggs. On day 5, the larval biomass of each substrate was collected and weighed per replica as well as the weight of 20 maggots per substrate per replica. After extraction of the larvae, 30 g of final residue per replica was collected for biochemical analysis. Preliminary results showed that the fresh larval biomass is influenced by the type of substrate used. The maximum and minimum fresh biomass were obtained with millet bran (3.638gr ± 0.334) and ruminal content (2.242gr ± .0.077), respectively. As for the mean weight of the 20 larvae, it was found that wheat bran (0.549mg ± 0.043) allowed better larval development while ruminal content (0.272mg ± 0.021) allowed a relatively low larval weight gain. Preliminary nutritional analyses of maggots have shown that maggots raised on rice husks showed the highest protein content (42.46%) while those raised on millet bran only showed a protein content of 37.85%. Concerning the fat content, the maggots produced on wheat bran were the richer (20.84%) while those produced on brewer grains had lower lipid level (13.20%). These results indicate that plant-based materials seem to be the most suitable for the insect development and that millet bran, locally produced and available, could be a suitable candidate for rearing M. domestica in Niger. Other analyses are still in progress (i.e. fatty acid compositions) to evaluate the quality of the insects produced and their potential integration in chicken nutrition.Multi-ingredient diets are also planned in order to optimize the growing and potentially the nutritional value of this species.

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26_10h30_70 Biomass and chemical composition of Musca domestica L. 1758 maggots breed on different feeding substrates...

As the need for high-quality and innovative chicken feed in Niger is increasing rapidly, the objective of this work was to investigate the potential of maggot production on locally available byproducts as a novel feed for poultry. Eight substrates (cow manure; cow rumen content; sorghum stem residue; millet glume; rice husk; brewer's grains; millet bran and wheat bran) were selected due to their open and easy access in the agricultural environment of Niamey. To test these monodiets, Musca domestica eggs were obtained from a M. domestica breeding unit set up at the university of Abdou Moumouni. Each diet (n = 3) was inoculated with 0.01 g of M. domestica eggs. On day 5, the larval biomass of each substrate was collected and weighed per replica as well as the weight of 20 maggots per substrate per replica. After extraction of the larvae, 30 g of final residue per replica was collected for biochemical analysis. Preliminary results showed that the fresh larval biomass is influenced by the type of substrate used. The maximum and minimum fresh biomass were obtained with millet bran (3.638gr ± 0.334) and ruminal content (2.242gr ± .0.077), respectively. As for the mean weight of the 20 larvae, it was found that wheat bran (0.549mg ± 0.043) allowed better larval development while ruminal content (0.272mg ± 0.021) allowed a relatively low larval weight gain. Preliminary nutritional analyses of maggots have shown that maggots raised on rice husks showed the highest protein content (42.46%) while those raised on millet bran only showed a protein content of 37.85%. Concerning the fat content, the maggots produced on wheat bran were the richer (20.84%) while those produced on brewer grains had lower lipid level (13.20%). These results indicate that plant-based materials seem to be the most suitable for the insect development and that millet bran, locally produced and available, could be a suitable candidate for rearing M. domestica in Niger. Other analyses are still in progress (i.e. fatty acid compositions) to evaluate the quality of the insects produced and their potential integration in chicken nutrition.Multi-ingredient diets are also planned in order to optimize the growing and potentially the nutritional value of this species.