DJANGO REINHARDT: The Chronological Classics 1944 – 1946






Tracklist 1944 – 1946
01 – 0:00:00 Welcome (2e Party)
02 – 0:02:20 I Can’t Give You Anything But Love
03 – 0:04:43 Artillerie Lourde
04 – 0:09:01 How High The Moon
05 – 0:11:22 If Dreams Come True
06 – 0:14:14 Hallelujah
07 – 0:17:06 Stompin’ At The Savoy
08 – 0:20:08 Djangology
09 – 0:22:45 Swing Guitars
10 – 0:25:09 Manior De Mes Reves
11 – 0:28:25 Are You In The Mood?
12 – 0:31:23 Coquette
13 – 0:34:29 Django’s Tiger
14 – 0:37:09 Embraceable You
15 – 0:40:19 Echoes Of France
16 – 0:43:06 Love’s Melody
17 – 0:46:19 Belleville
18 – 0:49:20 Nuages
19 – 0:52:39 Liza
20 – 0:55:33 Swingtime In Springtime
21 – 0:58:27 Yours And Mine
22 – 1:01:25 On The Sunny Side Of The Street
23 – 1:04:15 I Won’t Dance

DJANGO REINHARDT: The Chronological Classics 1944 – 1946

After the liberation of Paris swing music and musicians reemerged on the scene within days. Django Reinhardt often worked at various venues the same night – before participating in jam-sessions with visiting musicians from the American Armed Forces who were eager to play with the immensely popular guitarist. In addition. it was again possible to make real jazz-records – many of which featured Django both with new and old friends.

Jean Baptiste “Django” Reinhardt was born in Liverchies, Belgium, on January 23, 1910. Even as a child, he played violin, banjo and guitar. In the years following World War I, Django played with various bands in and around Paris. On November 2, 1928, his career seemed to have come to a premature end when his caravan went up in flames, seriously burning his left hand. After several operations and more than a year in hospital, he was able to play guitar again, although two fingers of his left hand remained permanently paralyzed. He continued working with today mostly forgotten musicians, but then began an association with singer Jean Sablon, who used him as accompanist on several recording-sessions. By now, he was enjoying increasing contacts with jazz and hot-dance musicians, and was beginning to record regularly with some of the best French bands, notably those led by Michel Warlop and Guy “Patrick” Paquinet. Django’s fame grew rapidly as a result of the first sessions by the “Quintet Du Hot Club De France”, and by the late thirties all visiting American jazz musicians were eagerly seeking the opportunity to record with him. His musical companion Stephane Grappelly spent the war years in England, whereas Django decided to remain in occupied France. Despite the persecution of gypsies, he was able to continue playing and recording. After the Liberation. he was still very much in favour with visiting American musicians, and in 1946 he even went to America to play with the Duke Ellington Orchestra. That same year also brought a joyful reunion with Grappelly. Django continued playing and recording, but gradually disappeared from the scene during the early fifties. Django Reinhardt died in Samois, east of Paris, on May 16. 1953.

This volume of the recordings of Django Reinhardt presented in chronological order, opens with the second part of “Welcome” by Noel Chiboust’s orchestra. (Django does not play on part 1.) This track marks the beginning of post-war jazz in France as it was recorded only five weeks after the liberation of the French capital. The same day, Reinhardt was finally able to record under his own name again. In January 1945. a contingent from Glenn Miller’s band plus Reinhardt turned in a number of fine performances, issued on the rare Jazz Club Francais label. In October 1945, Django often worked with “The European Division Band of the Air Transport Command”, directed by Jack Platt. Better known as “Django’s American Swing Band”, this unit featured mostly little-known, yet highly competent musicians. One of Django’s great admirer, trumpet player Lonnie Wilfong arranged some of the guitarist’s best and most popular compositions for this big band. The resulting records are outstanding ! Fortunately, more music by this band, featuring Django, has been preserved and is worth checking out at your CD-store. Tonic as these tracks are, they cannot be compared to the musical reunions with Stephane Grappelly in early 1946. The violonist had spent the war years in England and was now able to play and record with Reinhardt again. Considering the circumstances, next to “Belleville”, a true masterpiece: “Echoes Of France” proves to be one of the most emotionally charged and heart-warming documents from this 44-46 period ! To be continued…

Anatol Schenker. April 1997.

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DJANGO REINHARDT: The Chronological Classics 1944 - 1946

Tracklist 1944 - 1946

01 - 0:00:00 Welcome (2e Party)

02 - 0:02:20 I Can't Give You Anything But Love

03 - 0:04:43 Artillerie Lourde

04 - 0:09:01 How High The Moon

05 - 0:11:22 If Dreams Come True

06 - 0:14:14 Hallelujah

07 - 0:17:06 Stompin' At The Savoy

08 - 0:20:08 Djangology

09 - 0:22:45 Swing Guitars

10 - 0:25:09 Manior De Mes Reves

11 - 0:28:25 Are You In The Mood?

12 - 0:31:23 Coquette

13 - 0:34:29 Django's Tiger

14 - 0:37:09 Embraceable You

15 - 0:40:19 Echoes Of France

16 - 0:43:06 Love's Melody

17 - 0:46:19 Belleville

18 - 0:49:20 Nuages

19 - 0:52:39 Liza

20 - 0:55:33 Swingtime In Springtime

21 - 0:58:27 Yours And Mine

22 - 1:01:25 On The Sunny Side Of The Street

23 - 1:04:15 I Won't Dance

DJANGO REINHARDT: The Chronological Classics 1944 - 1946

After the liberation of Paris swing music and musicians reemerged on the scene within days. Django Reinhardt often worked at various venues the same night - before participating in jam-sessions with visiting musicians from the American Armed Forces who were eager to play with the immensely popular guitarist. In addition. it was again possible to make real jazz-records - many of which featured Django both with new and old friends.

Jean Baptiste "Django" Reinhardt was born in Liverchies, Belgium, on January 23, 1910. Even as a child, he played violin, banjo and guitar. In the years following World War I, Django played with various bands in and around Paris. On November 2, 1928, his career seemed to have come to a premature end when his caravan went up in flames, seriously burning his left hand. After several operations and more than a year in hospital, he was able to play guitar again, although two fingers of his left hand remained permanently paralyzed. He continued working with today mostly forgotten musicians, but then began an association with singer Jean Sablon, who used him as accompanist on several recording-sessions. By now, he was enjoying increasing contacts with jazz and hot-dance musicians, and was beginning to record regularly with some of the best French bands, notably those led by Michel Warlop and Guy "Patrick" Paquinet. Django's fame grew rapidly as a result of the first sessions by the "Quintet Du Hot Club De France", and by the late thirties all visiting American jazz musicians were eagerly seeking the opportunity to record with him. His musical companion Stephane Grappelly spent the war years in England, whereas Django decided to remain in occupied France. Despite the persecution of gypsies, he was able to continue playing and recording. After the Liberation. he was still very much in favour with visiting American musicians, and in 1946 he even went to America to play with the Duke Ellington Orchestra. That same year also brought a joyful reunion with Grappelly. Django continued playing and recording, but gradually disappeared from the scene during the early fifties. Django Reinhardt died in Samois, east of Paris, on May 16. 1953.

This volume of the recordings of Django Reinhardt presented in chronological order, opens with the second part of "Welcome" by Noel Chiboust's orchestra. (Django does not play on part 1.) This track marks the beginning of post-war jazz in France as it was recorded only five weeks after the liberation of the French capital. The same day, Reinhardt was finally able to record under his own name again. In January 1945. a contingent from Glenn Miller's band plus Reinhardt turned in a number of fine performances, issued on the rare Jazz Club Francais label. In October 1945, Django often worked with "The European Division Band of the Air Transport Command", directed by Jack Platt. Better known as "Django's American Swing Band'', this unit featured mostly little-known, yet highly competent musicians. One of Django's great admirer, trumpet player Lonnie Wilfong arranged some of the guitarist's best and most popular compositions for this big band. The resulting records are outstanding ! Fortunately, more music by this band, featuring Django, has been preserved and is worth checking out at your CD-store. Tonic as these tracks are, they cannot be compared to the musical reunions with Stephane Grappelly in early 1946. The violonist had spent the war years in England and was now able to play and record with Reinhardt again. Considering the circumstances, next to "Belleville", a true masterpiece: "Echoes Of France" proves to be one of the most emotionally charged and heart-warming documents from this 44-46 period ! To be continued...

Anatol Schenker. April 1997.