"Engineering Software as a Service," David Patterson and Armando Fox






May 8, 2013: “Engineering Software as a Service,” presented by David Patterson, University of California, Berkeley and former President of ACM; moderated by …

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"Engineering Software as a Service," David Patterson and Armando Fox

May 8, 2013: "Engineering Software as a Service," presented by David Patterson, University of California, Berkeley and former President of ACM; moderated by Armando Fox, University of California, Berkeley. Bonus: Extended, post-event Q&A with Dave Patterson (questions answered offline). More on Dave's Par Lab End of Project Celebration.

Software as a Service (SaaS) and Agile software development started simultaneously but independently. SaaS deploys software at one site made available over the Internet. Agile relies on incrementally developed prototypes and continuous customer feedback. Since Agile embraces change, it is an excellent match to SaaS's rapid evolution. Thus, Amazon, eBay, Facebook, Google...rely on Agile.

What You'll Learn About:

* The synergy between SaaS, Agile, and modern frameworks like Ruby on Rails and modern tools like Cucumber, RSpec, and Pivotal Track.
* Eliciting SaaS requirements from customers via User Stories.
* Following Behavior-Driven Design to convert SaaS User Stories into acceptance tests using Cucumber.
* Following Test-Driven Design to transform SaaS acceptance tests into unit tests using RSpec.
* Projecting SaaS app costs and schedule via Velocity using Pivotal Tracker.
* Organizing SaaS programming teams by following Scrum principles.

This talk is based on Massive Open Online Courses from UC Berkeley, offered in partnership with EdX (CS169.1x and CS169.2x), and a related textbook.

Presenter: David Patterson, University of California, Berkeley; Former President, ACM
David Patterson is the Pardee Professor of Computer Science at UC Berkeley and is currently Director of the Parallel Computing Lab. In the past, he served as Chair of Berkeley's CS Division, Chair of the CRA, and President of the ACM. His best-known research projects are Reduced Instruction Set Computers (RISC) and Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID). This research led to 6 books and 35 honors, including election to the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame as well as being named a Fellow of the Computer History Museum, ACM, IEEE, and both AAAS organizations. As a Californian, he does sports for fun: weekly soccer games, annual charity bike rides and sprint triathlons, and even an occasional weight-lifting contest.

Moderator: Armando Fox, University of California, Berkeley
Armando Fox is Professor in Residence at UC Berkeley and a researcher in the Berkeley ParLab (Parallel Computing Lab) working on high-productivity parallel programming. During his previous time at Stanford, he received teaching and mentoring awards from the Associated Students of Stanford University, the Society of Women Engineers, and Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society. He was named one of the "Scientific American 50" in 2003 and is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award and the Gilbreth Lectureship of the National Academy of Engineering. In previous lives he helped design the Intel Pentium Pro microprocessor and founded a successful startup to commercialize his UC Berkeley dissertation research on mobile computing. He received his other degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT and the University of Illinois and is an ACM Distinguished Member.