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Image from page 228 of “Cooley’s cyclopaedia of practical receipts and collateral information in the arts, manufactures, professions, and trades including medicine, pharmacy, hygiene, and domestic economy : designed as a comprehensive supplement to the Ph

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Image from page 228 of “Cooley’s cyclopaedia of practical receipts and collateral information in the arts, manufactures, professions, and trades including medicine, pharmacy, hygiene, and domestic economy : designed as a comprehensive supplement to the Ph
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Identifier: cooleyscyclopaed02cool
Title: Cooley’s cyclopaedia of practical receipts and collateral information in the arts, manufactures, professions, and trades including medicine, pharmacy, hygiene, and domestic economy : designed as a comprehensive supplement to the Pharmacopoeia and general book of reference for the manufacturer, tradesman, amateur, and heads of families
Year: 1880 (1880s)
Authors: Cooley, Arnold James Tuson, Richard Vine, 1832-1888
Subjects: Industrial arts Technology Recipes Pharmaceutical Preparations
Publisher: London : J. & A. Churchill
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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se-corn of this country,but in the northern parts of the country it isextensively used as food for man. The huskedgrain constitutes GEOATS, and its meal oat-meal. The latter does not form a dough withwater, as wheaten meal or flour does. Oats consist of frGm24s to28gof husk, and74^ to 78g of grain. According to M. Payen,they contain of starch,6059^; azotised matter,1439£; saccharine and gummy matter, 925g ;fatty matter, 5*50{?; cellulose, 7602; silica andsaline matter, 325-g. The husks contain be-tween 6 and 7g of saline matter. (Prof.Norton.) The ash amounts to 218^, andconsists of potassa and soda, 2618g; lime,595g; magnesia, 995^ j oxide of iron, 40^;phosphoric acid, 4384^; sulphuric acid, 1045^;chlorine, -26^; silica, 2-67§; alumina, •QQ%.(Johnston.) The yield of oats is from 20 bushels peracre in poor soils, up to 60, 70, and even 80bushels per acre in rich soils. The weight perbushel varies from 35 to 45 lbs., and the pro-duct in meal is about one half the weight ofthe oats.

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Wliite oat-Loiig. sect., Snd and Srd coats not separable, a. Compound grains x 100; 5. Que do. x 500. A large proportion of the oats given tohorses passes off undigested. It has hencebeen proposed to prevent this loss, by eithercoarsely bruising them in a mill, or by pour-ing boiling water over them, and allowing them to macerate till cold, when they are tobe given to the horses without straining ofi.the water. It is stated on good authoritythat oats thus treated will not only fattenquicker, but go twice as far as without pre- U18 OATMEAL—OBSTRUCTION OP LOCAL AUTHORITY paration. Oat bruisers are now manufacturedby most agricultural iuipletnent makers. Under tlie microscope the oat is seen to con-sist of two or three envelopes ; the outer beingcomposed of lougitudinul cells j the second ob-liquely transverse and not very clearly seen ;in this, the cells are wanting in part or passinto the cells of the third coat; the third en-velope consists of a layer, usually single, ofcells, like

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Image from page 391 of “Cooley’s cyclopaedia of practical receipts and collateral information in the arts, manufactures, professions, and trades including medicine, pharmacy, hygiene, and domestic economy : designed as a comprehensive supplement to the Ph
Weight Loss Supplements
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Identifier: cooleyscyclopaed01cool
Title: Cooley’s cyclopaedia of practical receipts and collateral information in the arts, manufactures, professions, and trades including medicine, pharmacy, hygiene, and domestic economy : designed as a comprehensive supplement to the Pharmacopoeia and general book of reference for the manufacturer, tradesman, amateur, and heads of families
Year: 1880 (1880s)
Authors: Cooley, Arnold James Tuson, Richard Vine, 1832-1888
Subjects: Industrial arts Technology Recipes Pharmaceutical Preparations
Publisher: London : J. & A. Churchill
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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fat which hasbeen previously melted to the lowest possibletemperature, and then immediately allowed tocongeal. 5. Professor Wanklyn carefully weighsone gram of butter, and heats it in a pla-tinum dish of the size shown in the accom-panying figure, from four to six hours or evenmore—in short, until it ceases to lose weight.The loss of weight is the water, which shouldbe calculated and expressed in per-cen-tages. Jat. The dried butter is now to be heatedwith ether (the ether should be made to boilby floating the dish in hot water). Severalsuccessive portions should be taken, the wholepassed through a filter, the filter well washedwith ether, and the filtrate evaporated to dry-ness and weighed, Caseine and Ash. The residue from whichthe fat and water have been extracted is nowto be taken, carefully weighed, then burneddown to a low red heat; the residue remain-ing is the ash, the loss the caseine. The amount of ash, practically speaking, isthe salt, but if there be any doubt as to its

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Butter-analysiiig dish. composition, the chlorine may be estimated bya volumetric solution of nitrate of silver, andfurther examined. The following table shows the compositionof a few genuine and other butters, examinedaccording to the same, or at least to a simi-lar process to the one described:— Ash, Fat. principallySalt. Water. Caseine. Quality. Fresh Devonshire 82-7 1-1 16-2 16-2 Good. Waneiyn. butter. Normandy butter. 82-1 1-8 161 16-1 3» j> Jersey butter. 78-491 8-528 10-445 2-536 3> Angell and Normandy butter. 82-643 2-915 9-305 5-137 Hehnee. Butter from Vent- 86-280 6-600 3-831 3-289 » Found to be adul- » nor. terated with fo-reign fat. Butter from Lon- 87-50 1-559 23-981 6-880 Adulterated with » don. water. » » 47-119 2-689 42-358 7-834 Adulterated withwater, and con-tains an excessof curd. M 6. A Method of Detecting Meat Fats inButter. Mr Horsley, writing to the Chemi-cal News, September, 1874, says:—My start-ing point is, that fresh butter is permanentlysolu

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Image from page 38 of “Cooley’s cyclopaedia of practical receipts and collateral information in the arts, manufactures, professions, and trades including medicine, pharmacy, hygiene, and domestic economy : designed as a comprehensive supplement to the Pha
Weight Loss Supplements
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: cooleyscyclopaed01cool
Title: Cooley’s cyclopaedia of practical receipts and collateral information in the arts, manufactures, professions, and trades including medicine, pharmacy, hygiene, and domestic economy : designed as a comprehensive supplement to the Pharmacopoeia and general book of reference for the manufacturer, tradesman, amateur, and heads of families
Year: 1880 (1880s)
Authors: Cooley, Arnold James Tuson, Richard Vine, 1832-1888
Subjects: Industrial arts Technology Recipes Pharmaceutical Preparations
Publisher: London : J. & A. Churchill
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

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may be obtainedby dissolving the bicar-bonate in exactly 1000gr. of distilled watercon-tained in a * Scbustersalkalimeter, previouslyvery carefully weighed;in which case each grainof the test-solution willindicate rgth of a grain,or Ol^ of absolute aceticacid, whilst every 10 grains will be equal to 1grain, or 1^. The test-solution may also be prepared frombicarbonate of soda, or from the carbonates ofsoda or potash, care being taken that thequantity of the salt dissolved be in proportionto its molecular weight. 2. (Brande.) A small piece of white marble,clean and dry, is weighed, and then suspendedby a silk thread in a weighed sample (say 100or 1000 grs.) of the vinegar or acid underexamination; the action being promoted byoccasionally stirring the liquid with a glassrod, until the whole of the acid is saturated, asshown by no further action on the marblebeing observable on close inspection. Themarble is then withdrawn, washed in distilledwater, dried and weighed. The loss in weight

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24 ACETIMETRY which it has sustained will be nearly equal tothe acetic acid present, or strictly, as 50 (mar-ble) to 60 (absolute acetic acid). The onlyprecautions required are, to avoid striking thepiece of marble with the rod whilst stirringthe solution, or causing loss of siibstance in itafter its withdrawal; and to allow ample timefor the action of the acid on it. If the sampleconsists of strong acid, it should be dilutedwith twice or thrice its weight of water beforesuspending the marble in it. 3. (lire.) 100 grains of the sample underexamination is slightly reddened with tinctureof litmus, and ammonia of the sp. gr. 0992 isadded drop by drop (from an acetimeter hold-ing 1000 water-gr. measure, divided into 100divisions) until precise neutralisation iseffected, indicated by the blue colour of thelitmus being restored. The number of thedivisions of the acetimeter used, multiplied by60, and the first two right-hand figures of theproduct cut off as decimals, gives a numberwhich repr

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