Tag Archives: south

Flesh hounds flanked in the south

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Flesh hounds flanked in the south
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Image by jon_a_ross
Battle report here jon-a-ross.livejournal.com/949385.html

Battle Report: 1000 points Khorne Daemons vs. 1000 points Zombies (Vampire Counts)
Six turns (plus one) Zombies move first.

The zombie hordes had seen one battle before, that against the beasts of Chaos army. In that struggle the zombies were counted as the losers, with much of their army ripped to pieces. But it had moments where a zombie victory seemed possible. So the zombies are pulled out again to battle against 1000 points of Khorne daemons. 4 groups of 40 zombies, each with a standard and a musician are lead by one necromancer with all the spells on his corpse cart and another necromancer on foot with the book of dancing dead.

The khorne forces are lead by one Herald of Khorne with flaming attacks and body armour. The mighty herald joins a unit of 11 bloodletters with full command and will lead two more units of 10 bloodletters (full command) and two groups of flesh hounds into battle (11 total). The bloodletters are mostly untried in Fantasy, having seen some action in 40K. In 40K they are excellent marine killers but not so good against guardsmen. We shall see how they do against the fantasy undead.

Unlike the last time the zombies fought with seven pieces of terrain crowding the battlefield, we go with a lightly dotted landscape. One hill crested with heads from a lost civilization. The monolith (one of many that dot my warhammer world) and a small hill with more rocks on it are all that can be seen.

With the zombie first move the plan is straight forward. The necromancer will use the book to move one group of zombies in the south forward in an effort to flank the line of daemons when they hit the zombies in the middle of the table. A group of zombies is raised from the dead and bolstered with more zombies to intercept the approaching flesh hounds in the north. The magic phase goes almost entirely the way the undead wish, with the zombie general getting both his spells cast, as well as the bound spells all working. Only the necromancer on foot fails his spell, rolling a single die looking for 4.

The Daemons of Khorne move forward, not recklessly but carefully. Both groups of flesh hounds are moved to flank, one in the north and one in the south. The bloodletters themselves move forward slowly. One unit of ten on each side of their commander and his unit of 11. (I deployed them in file of 4 because I thought that was legal. As I understand now looking over the rules that 4 is 6th edition thinking and it has to be 5 for 7th edition. I’ll double check later, but carried on the battle regardless.)

Zombie turn two was more slowing shifting forward with failed charges from the lead zombies. More dead summoned, with the raise dead spell being stopped by the dice. It also allowed the daemons to stop the corpse cart from granting strikes first to the zombies around it. That power will promise to be painful.

Daemon turn 2 is marked by charging. Four units charge into the zombies and deal heavy damage. Over 20 zombies fall either through injury or their magic failing to hold them together. The herald and his unit score only 2 kills, even after rerolling to hit because of their hatred. This results in the herald’s unit losing combat and making a leadership test itself.

Zombie turn 3 sees another group of zombies launch a charge against the bloodletter line. This time the zombies are able to flank and will add their weight to pushing the bloodletters down. The dispel dice come up snake eyes, giving the zombies total control over the rest of the magic phase. More undead are raised into existence to flank charge next turn, while a number of the existing units are increased in size. The bloodletters which are being flanked are having terrible luck rolling dice, scoring four ones to hit and one one to wound. In that battle the daemons will end up losing combat and having three lost to warp instability.

Daemon turn 3 has the daemons with their only unengaged unit, the flesh hounds in the south, attempt to charge the zombies and come up short. The rest of the daemons have no choice but to attempt to slay the unliving foes that now threaten to pull them down. Much to the horror of the daemons, they actually use more of their number this turn then they slay zombies. The corpse cart has given the zombies unnatural speed. It accounted for very little last phase but this time the daemons feel their low toughness score. The one group of daemons fighting off 60 zombies, 11 at a time, end up losing combat so badly that between the wounds from the zombies and daemonic instability they are wiped out. Now it becomes 35 daemons against 150 zombies or so.

Zombie turn 4 sees the zombies push in towards the bloodletters. Both the remaining bloodletter groups are now fighting on two sides, with the herald of khorne and his bloodletters being attacked by over 60 zombies. The magic phase goes to the undead as the dispel dice are held to cancel the strike first powers of the corpse cart. Thus another group of zombies can be summoned and added to. This group shall be used to flank the flesh hounds when they charge into the zombie mess.

The close combat phase also goes badly for the bloodletters. Another bad roll off the bloodletters results in only a single zombie death and then a loss of combat for the daemons. Five daemons die in the center and five zombies, not an exchange rate the daemons can afford. The only upside is that the flesh hounds have an excellent round against the zombies they were fighting in the north, destroying the group completely after the leadership test.

Daemon turn 4 has the few remaining bloodletters worried. They are both fighting battles on two sides, against foes that are just strong enough to wound them one third of the time, and who hit them one third of the time. Sure one third of the time they save the wound, but the numbers against them are adding up.

Lucky, the flesh hounds of khorne are able to both smash into the zombie horde like bookends. It took the group in the south four turns to finally get into combat, but thankfully it is going to be worth the wait. The flesh hounds hit the zombies and kill six on the first impact. The zombie horde makes the snake eyes leadership test and loses no more members.

In the north the flesh hounds also strike into the zombies, and the zombies fail their leadership with an eleven. The general will be able to give his leadership to them, but still a large number of zombies fall as the magic that bounds them together fails against the flesh hounds.

Zombie turn five has the zombies looking not as impressive as before. The necromancer on foot is trying to stay out of the way of the khorne daemons should they win, while the general on the corpse cart is trying to get his cart into a position to maximize the strike first power. The flesh hounds in the south get charged by zombies, trying to break them.

The magic phase doesn’t work as well for the zombies, as they are attempting to boost their zombie’s attacks and numbers. Another group of zombies is summoned to rear charge the flesh hounds next turn if possible. The book of dancing is able to allow a group of six zombies to attack now out of turn, an attack that kills two daemons. However, that is the only good thing that happens for the zombies this phase, as the last remains of the group that the flesh hounds charged fall. Another daemon falls in the other combats, but they manage to take twelve zombies with them.

Daemon turn five is the final nail in the coffin of the zombies. The flesh hounds, having ripped through two groups of zombies, are free to charge the necromancer general on the corpse cart. The ranks are redressed to bring the maximum bloodletters against the zombies in the north, and the battle will come to a head here.

The flesh hounds are able to rip the corpse cart to pieces, even with its regeneration. The necromancer lands on his feet against the flesh hounds, worried. The other zombies also lose their various combats. Eighteen daemons remain out of the forty three that launched the battle. There are still over 100 zombies in play but it doesn’t look good for them.

Zombie turn six has the zombies in a tough place. Their general is in single combat against six flesh hounds of khorne. Their zombie hordes are two large blocks and then four small blocks being threatened. A group of zombies that were summoned last turn to attack the flesh hounds get their chance, rushing in to attempt to save the general. Using all their magic the zombies try to get strike first and extra attacks for the zombies against those flesh hounds.

It isn’t enough, as the flesh hounds are able to rip the necromancer general into pieces. However, all that magic being shot around allows the zombies to catch and rip the daemon herald of khorne and his bloodletter escort into pieces. The herald himself falls to daemonic instability as two of his escort fell to zombie claws. So at the end of the turn we have both generals dead and the combat coming to an end. The zombies hold themselves together well with the general dead, only a handful die.

Daemon turn six has the daemons pushing forward their advantage and cutting down the necromancer on foot with their last bloodletters. The flesh hounds keep chewing into their zombie targets. One group of zombies will be lost, leaving fourteen daemons of khorne against 56 zombies. The ratio of zombie to daemon is finally swinging in favour of the daemons.

Thus ends the official six turns of the game, with the points saying that the daemons of khorne have won. 725 or so points for the zombies and 950 or so points for the daemons of khorne. A close match in the end, and close enough that it calls for one more turn.

Turn seven for the zombies sees some bad leadership rolls with their general dead. One group of zombies fighting the flesh hounds in the north falls apart completely, while the other two groups, even with their losses, are able to charge the last bloodletters. The zombies are then able to pull those last bloodletters to pieces, without giving the bloodletters a chance to strike back.

Daemon turn seven has the flesh hounds charge one group of zombies, smashing through it and following up against to the final group of zombies.

And as the game was down to three units, I kept going. Zombie turn eight has a handful of zombies fall without the magic of their general holding them together, but the flesh hounds fail to wound a zombie on their own. In revenge the zombies are able to pull down one flesh hound, after instability rolls.

The second group of flesh hounds joins into the battle against the zombies and it will end quickly with the zombies putting up some brief struggle.

Flesh hound charge on daemon turn five will determine the game
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Image by jon_a_ross
Battle report here jon-a-ross.livejournal.com/949385.html

Battle Report: 1000 points Khorne Daemons vs. 1000 points Zombies (Vampire Counts)
Six turns (plus one) Zombies move first.

The zombie hordes had seen one battle before, that against the beasts of Chaos army. In that struggle the zombies were counted as the losers, with much of their army ripped to pieces. But it had moments where a zombie victory seemed possible. So the zombies are pulled out again to battle against 1000 points of Khorne daemons. 4 groups of 40 zombies, each with a standard and a musician are lead by one necromancer with all the spells on his corpse cart and another necromancer on foot with the book of dancing dead.

The khorne forces are lead by one Herald of Khorne with flaming attacks and body armour. The mighty herald joins a unit of 11 bloodletters with full command and will lead two more units of 10 bloodletters (full command) and two groups of flesh hounds into battle (11 total). The bloodletters are mostly untried in Fantasy, having seen some action in 40K. In 40K they are excellent marine killers but not so good against guardsmen. We shall see how they do against the fantasy undead.

Unlike the last time the zombies fought with seven pieces of terrain crowding the battlefield, we go with a lightly dotted landscape. One hill crested with heads from a lost civilization. The monolith (one of many that dot my warhammer world) and a small hill with more rocks on it are all that can be seen.

With the zombie first move the plan is straight forward. The necromancer will use the book to move one group of zombies in the south forward in an effort to flank the line of daemons when they hit the zombies in the middle of the table. A group of zombies is raised from the dead and bolstered with more zombies to intercept the approaching flesh hounds in the north. The magic phase goes almost entirely the way the undead wish, with the zombie general getting both his spells cast, as well as the bound spells all working. Only the necromancer on foot fails his spell, rolling a single die looking for 4.

The Daemons of Khorne move forward, not recklessly but carefully. Both groups of flesh hounds are moved to flank, one in the north and one in the south. The bloodletters themselves move forward slowly. One unit of ten on each side of their commander and his unit of 11. (I deployed them in file of 4 because I thought that was legal. As I understand now looking over the rules that 4 is 6th edition thinking and it has to be 5 for 7th edition. I’ll double check later, but carried on the battle regardless.)

Zombie turn two was more slowing shifting forward with failed charges from the lead zombies. More dead summoned, with the raise dead spell being stopped by the dice. It also allowed the daemons to stop the corpse cart from granting strikes first to the zombies around it. That power will promise to be painful.

Daemon turn 2 is marked by charging. Four units charge into the zombies and deal heavy damage. Over 20 zombies fall either through injury or their magic failing to hold them together. The herald and his unit score only 2 kills, even after rerolling to hit because of their hatred. This results in the herald’s unit losing combat and making a leadership test itself.

Zombie turn 3 sees another group of zombies launch a charge against the bloodletter line. This time the zombies are able to flank and will add their weight to pushing the bloodletters down. The dispel dice come up snake eyes, giving the zombies total control over the rest of the magic phase. More undead are raised into existence to flank charge next turn, while a number of the existing units are increased in size. The bloodletters which are being flanked are having terrible luck rolling dice, scoring four ones to hit and one one to wound. In that battle the daemons will end up losing combat and having three lost to warp instability.

Daemon turn 3 has the daemons with their only unengaged unit, the flesh hounds in the south, attempt to charge the zombies and come up short. The rest of the daemons have no choice but to attempt to slay the unliving foes that now threaten to pull them down. Much to the horror of the daemons, they actually use more of their number this turn then they slay zombies. The corpse cart has given the zombies unnatural speed. It accounted for very little last phase but this time the daemons feel their low toughness score. The one group of daemons fighting off 60 zombies, 11 at a time, end up losing combat so badly that between the wounds from the zombies and daemonic instability they are wiped out. Now it becomes 35 daemons against 150 zombies or so.

Zombie turn 4 sees the zombies push in towards the bloodletters. Both the remaining bloodletter groups are now fighting on two sides, with the herald of khorne and his bloodletters being attacked by over 60 zombies. The magic phase goes to the undead as the dispel dice are held to cancel the strike first powers of the corpse cart. Thus another group of zombies can be summoned and added to. This group shall be used to flank the flesh hounds when they charge into the zombie mess.

The close combat phase also goes badly for the bloodletters. Another bad roll off the bloodletters results in only a single zombie death and then a loss of combat for the daemons. Five daemons die in the center and five zombies, not an exchange rate the daemons can afford. The only upside is that the flesh hounds have an excellent round against the zombies they were fighting in the north, destroying the group completely after the leadership test.

Daemon turn 4 has the few remaining bloodletters worried. They are both fighting battles on two sides, against foes that are just strong enough to wound them one third of the time, and who hit them one third of the time. Sure one third of the time they save the wound, but the numbers against them are adding up.

Lucky, the flesh hounds of khorne are able to both smash into the zombie horde like bookends. It took the group in the south four turns to finally get into combat, but thankfully it is going to be worth the wait. The flesh hounds hit the zombies and kill six on the first impact. The zombie horde makes the snake eyes leadership test and loses no more members.

In the north the flesh hounds also strike into the zombies, and the zombies fail their leadership with an eleven. The general will be able to give his leadership to them, but still a large number of zombies fall as the magic that bounds them together fails against the flesh hounds.

Zombie turn five has the zombies looking not as impressive as before. The necromancer on foot is trying to stay out of the way of the khorne daemons should they win, while the general on the corpse cart is trying to get his cart into a position to maximize the strike first power. The flesh hounds in the south get charged by zombies, trying to break them.

The magic phase doesn’t work as well for the zombies, as they are attempting to boost their zombie’s attacks and numbers. Another group of zombies is summoned to rear charge the flesh hounds next turn if possible. The book of dancing is able to allow a group of six zombies to attack now out of turn, an attack that kills two daemons. However, that is the only good thing that happens for the zombies this phase, as the last remains of the group that the flesh hounds charged fall. Another daemon falls in the other combats, but they manage to take twelve zombies with them.

Daemon turn five is the final nail in the coffin of the zombies. The flesh hounds, having ripped through two groups of zombies, are free to charge the necromancer general on the corpse cart. The ranks are redressed to bring the maximum bloodletters against the zombies in the north, and the battle will come to a head here.

The flesh hounds are able to rip the corpse cart to pieces, even with its regeneration. The necromancer lands on his feet against the flesh hounds, worried. The other zombies also lose their various combats. Eighteen daemons remain out of the forty three that launched the battle. There are still over 100 zombies in play but it doesn’t look good for them.

Zombie turn six has the zombies in a tough place. Their general is in single combat against six flesh hounds of khorne. Their zombie hordes are two large blocks and then four small blocks being threatened. A group of zombies that were summoned last turn to attack the flesh hounds get their chance, rushing in to attempt to save the general. Using all their magic the zombies try to get strike first and extra attacks for the zombies against those flesh hounds.

It isn’t enough, as the flesh hounds are able to rip the necromancer general into pieces. However, all that magic being shot around allows the zombies to catch and rip the daemon herald of khorne and his bloodletter escort into pieces. The herald himself falls to daemonic instability as two of his escort fell to zombie claws. So at the end of the turn we have both generals dead and the combat coming to an end. The zombies hold themselves together well with the general dead, only a handful die.

Daemon turn six has the daemons pushing forward their advantage and cutting down the necromancer on foot with their last bloodletters. The flesh hounds keep chewing into their zombie targets. One group of zombies will be lost, leaving fourteen daemons of khorne against 56 zombies. The ratio of zombie to daemon is finally swinging in favour of the daemons.

Thus ends the official six turns of the game, with the points saying that the daemons of khorne have won. 725 or so points for the zombies and 950 or so points for the daemons of khorne. A close match in the end, and close enough that it calls for one more turn.

Turn seven for the zombies sees some bad leadership rolls with their general dead. One group of zombies fighting the flesh hounds in the north falls apart completely, while the other two groups, even with their losses, are able to charge the last bloodletters. The zombies are then able to pull those last bloodletters to pieces, without giving the bloodletters a chance to strike back.

Daemon turn seven has the flesh hounds charge one group of zombies, smashing through it and following up against to the final group of zombies.

And as the game was down to three units, I kept going. Zombie turn eight has a handful of zombies fall without the magic of their general holding them together, but the flesh hounds fail to wound a zombie on their own. In revenge the zombies are able to pull down one flesh hound, after instability rolls.

The second group of flesh hounds joins into the battle against the zombies and it will end quickly with the zombies putting up some brief struggle.

Aerobithon – U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, South Korea – 19 May 2012

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Aerobithon – U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, South Korea – 19 May 2012
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Image by USAG-Humphreys
Click here to learn more about Camp Humphreys

U.S. Army photos by Rakendra Moore

Camp Humphreys hosts aerobithon

By Rakendra Moore
USAG Humphreys Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS — An aerobithon was held at the Super Gym May 19, with participants dancing, spinning, and jumping their way to better fitness.

“It was great,” said Elvia Palumbo, one of the Zumba instructors for the event. “This was a great way to introduce all of the classes offered in the Super Gym.”

The aerobithon included a warm-up session, followed by Zumba, a stationary bicycle workout and yoga.

“We worked the total body,” said Karen Morton, who organized the aerobithon. “Exercising like this helps you feel better about yourself.”

Morton once weighed 260 pounds, but turned her life around with regular workouts and can now say, “I think I look good for my age.”

Blair Bogle, who also participated in last year’s aerobithon, likewise praised the virtues of diet and exercise.

“Living a healthy life is an everyday thing,” she said.

“I think the energy is high and people are into taking care of their body for a lifetime,” Morton added. “This is a lifestyle for me.”

Also participating was the husband-wife team of Peter and Christi Herring, who have lost a total of 73 pounds this year.

“This was meant for younger people,” Mrs. Herring said with a laugh. “But I like it.”

IMG_2997
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Image by SOMBILON PHOTOGRAPHY | GALLERY | VIDEOGRAPHY

Aerobithon – U.S. Army Garrison Humphreys, South Korea – 19 May 2012
yoga for weight loss
Image by USAG-Humphreys
Click here to learn more about Camp Humphreys

U.S. Army photos by Rakendra Moore

Camp Humphreys hosts aerobithon

By Rakendra Moore
USAG Humphreys Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS — An aerobithon was held at the Super Gym May 19, with participants dancing, spinning, and jumping their way to better fitness.

“It was great,” said Elvia Palumbo, one of the Zumba instructors for the event. “This was a great way to introduce all of the classes offered in the Super Gym.”

The aerobithon included a warm-up session, followed by Zumba, a stationary bicycle workout and yoga.

“We worked the total body,” said Karen Morton, who organized the aerobithon. “Exercising like this helps you feel better about yourself.”

Morton once weighed 260 pounds, but turned her life around with regular workouts and can now say, “I think I look good for my age.”

Blair Bogle, who also participated in last year’s aerobithon, likewise praised the virtues of diet and exercise.

“Living a healthy life is an everyday thing,” she said.

“I think the energy is high and people are into taking care of their body for a lifetime,” Morton added. “This is a lifestyle for me.”

Also participating was the husband-wife team of Peter and Christi Herring, who have lost a total of 73 pounds this year.

“This was meant for younger people,” Mrs. Herring said with a laugh. “But I like it.”

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Photomontage of Overview of the south hangar, including B-29 “Enola Gay” and Concorde

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Photomontage of Overview of the south hangar, including B-29 “Enola Gay” and Concorde
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eCred
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So I’m looking for a weight vest. Big purchase, hundreds of bucks, I
know nothing about how to buy one. My instinct is to go online and
find some sort of user forum where people have posted opinions about
weight vests. I check metafilter, then google, then amazon. On amazon
I punch up a couple of vests that have no reviews, then I find the
review pictured here for an Everlast vest.

First instinct: this guy is associated with XVest. There are many
examples of this sort of guerilla internet marketing, in fact I had a
date with a woman whose full-time job is to lurk in travel chat
rooms, assuming one of a number of pseudonyms, and advocate for her
client’s travel products.

More evolved sites have addressed this. Notice the "see all my
reviews" button. I clicked on it. This guy has reviewed all sorts of
shit, and one look at his review of Boards of Canada’s _Campfire
Headphase_, which I have pasted below, is all I needed. This guy is
for real, and I ain’t buying the Everlast vest.

18 of 25 people found the following review helpful:

Rembrandt and Van Gogh reincarnated…, October 23, 2005

I get it…I finally get it. It’s no wonder that BOC’s Michael
Sandison and Marcus Eoin (Sandison) have revelead they are brothers.
It takes two people from the same genetic gene pool to make music
THIS GOOD. After listening to their latest masterwork, The Campfire
Headphase, I now understand what BOC’s music is meant to portray. I
believe that Boards’ music is a virtual road map of the human soul.
Each new album and release Boards puts out is a musical
representation of a particular stage in human exisitence. The
Campfire Headphase represents "adulthood". Follow me for an
interesting ride.

Music Has The Right To Children in 1998 was BOC’s seminal work. It
was their first official LP. Through inference of the title, this
album represented "childhood". Each song has a rustic, analog feel to
it. The album is replete with children laughing, saying "I love
you" (Color of the Fire), learning shapes (Triangles and Rhombuses)
and counting with the teacher in elementary school (Aquarius). There
are references to educational films and public television (One Very
Important Thought). Even "Telephasic Workshop" is a play on words as
compared to The Children’s Television Workshop, who brought us
childhood classics such as Sesame Street and The Electric Company.
MHTRTC contains tons of samples from these two shows.

Music… is Boards’ universally worshipped album because so many
adult listeners discovered it in their late 20’s and 30’s, when their
formerly optimisic youthful lives had become sad, corrupted and mired
in work, bills and bad relationships. This album reminds us of the
tender, innocent, happy childhood we lost yet is not too late to
recapture.

This brings us to Geogaddi in 2002, BOC’s second, most controversial,
and the most polarized amongst their fans. The reason why is simple–
Geogaddi represents "adolescence" and young adulthood, say between 13
and 28 or so, a good 15-year period. Geogaddi’s music is intrusive,
in your face and agressive, like a teenager enraged with hormones,
confused and aroused by his newborn sexuality. The music is powerful,
crisper, and braver than the previous album yet intentionally
pretentious and insecure, reminiscent of a teen’s false bravado in
his/her attempts to lure a sexual partner. Titles like "Julie and
Candy", "Beware the Friendly Stranger" implies sexual predation and
curiosity. "Opening the Mouth" and "You Can Feel The Sky" refer to
the intense feelings of losing one’s virginity. Young people are now
in high school or college, learing more advanced and complex subject
matters, such as mathematics, music and formulas (Music is Math, The
Smallest Weird Number, A is to B as B is to C, Dandelion). The
childhood represented in MHTRTC is now disgusting to the adolescent
know-it-all in Geogaddi. One can’t wait to bid childhood "bye, bye,
bye, byeeeeee…" as in Sunshine Recorder. In fact, you’d better
"record" bits and pieces of your childhood "sunshine" or they will be
gone forever. BOC did and that’s why MHTRTC was so great in recording
childhood sensations. Keep in mind, teenagers and college students
feel they are at an age where they feel the world revolves around
them. The very name "Geogaddi" means "to revolve around the world
TWICE". Teens must be so vain, eh? Fans recommended to "play
[Geogaddi] TWICE before listening". It is at this time in our lives
that we may experiement with drugs or become entrenched with unsavory
company, such as cults, as evidenced by so many references to
subliminals, Satanists and Branch Dividians (The Devil is in the
Details, 1969, etc.) "Gyroscope" takes the innocent number counting
of "Aquarius" and subverts it into a perverse, schizophrenic parody
of number-obession. BOC endured a lot criticism by fans, as they
interpreted Geogaddi to have lost that "warm sound" and suffered a
sophomore’s jinx. Geogaddi gave so many listeners an awkward, angry
experience, reminding them of unpleasant adolescent memories,
triggering sensitive moments of dread, sexual shame and rebellion.
These are the haters of Geogaddi. Others are reminded of young
acheivement, sexual conquest and higher learning. These are the
lovers of Geogaddi. I tend toward the middle, leaning toward the
hating side. My life sucked between 12 and 30, especially in romance
and finance. Geogaddi nails each angry, black, self-loathsome feeling
I ever experienced with spades. I hate them for planting the mirror
to my face, exposing my flaws to the world yet love them for doing so
in order to learn to love and heal myself and thusly prepare me for
the next ablum…The Campfire Headphase.

The Campfire Headphase represents solid adulthood–your 30’s and
40’s. Like the Sandison brothers, many people at this stage of life
are married, and/or have children. They may have secure jobs and
prefer a Netflix night rather than a wild night of clubbin’ and
sluttin’. Geogaddi’s music was electric and virile, like the pompous
high school football star. Headphase’s music is acoustic, organic and
mellow, like getting stoned by a campfire. The initials of this album
is TCH, which could very well be an anagram of THC. The biggest
obsevation about this album is its use of guitars (or clever guitar
samples). Those who complain about the guitars (which are only
noticable on a handful of tracks) do not understand that acoustics-a-
la-Music70 were going to be a natural progression of Boards’ music.
To make a sequel to MHTRTC would have been a lazy, backwards
decision. To create "Music Part 2" would have invalidated Geogaddi
completely, reducing it as a self-indulgent mistake (some obtuse fans
wouldn’t mind this outcome). There was no way Mike and Marcus was
going to allow that to happen. TCH had to be mellow in order to allow
us to contemplate the harshness of the near-indigestible Geogaddi and
to fully appreciate how beautiful, and necessary that album was to
understand ourselves. Every time I listen to TCH, Geogaddi becomes
even more special. You have to take the sweet and the harsh, as in
Boards of Canada and as in life. You don’t really understand that
lesson until you are in your 30’s. God bless you Boards for guiding
me through that lesson. When I heard Peacock Tail, I understood
everything…why I went through the type of life I’ve led so far, the
smart decisions and foolish mistakes I’ve made in my life and why my
childhood sounded like MHTRTC and why my teens and 20’s felt like
Geogaddi. Peacock Tail is the only Boards song other than Aquarius
that made me cry on the first listen.

TCH is an album of crisp, digital music. It feels almost like BOC in
high-def surround sound. The way the BOC-brothas equalize and alter
their music envelops me and a warm sea glass cocoon. Every song feels
like subliminal line noise is dancing through them, as if my
headphones are too close to my wall and I can hear random radio
singals through the electral outlet. My favorite tune as of this
writing is Slow This Bird Down, not for its melody or message, but
just for sheer technique. How is it possbile that a song transmutes
itself into a scratchy, broken radio transmission? Constants and
Changing uses the EQ to mess with your ears; parts are muffled,
others are pronounced. Your ears are fighting to pick up something
precise in the song, like an amorphous signal from outer space.
Brilliant. This album celebrates the freedom, leisure and self-
assuredness of adulthood (A Moment of Clarity, ’84 Pontiac Dream) but
also reminds us that this period of life still brings heartbreak and
sadness. Farewell Fire is the one of the most heartwrenching and
saddest pieces I have ever heard–a 21st Century version of
Albonini’s Adagio in G Minor for Strings and Organ. Eveytime I hear
this piece I think of the only woman to ever break my heart twice and
how the pain still manages to linger to this day (you know who you
are, Michelle…) This song also has possibly the longest fade out in
the history of man.

Guitars are nothing new with this album. BOC has been using analog
instrumentation long before the Twoism days. I have a friend in
Ireland who managed to get a hold a copy of two unreleased BOC demo
cassettes and a copy of the almost-mythical Acid Memories from 1989.
Yes, these tapes are authentic. No, you won’t get a copy from me or
online. This music is not even on any file-sharing programs and trust
me, I have ’em all. You won’t find them on the internet, period.
Based on these unreleased recordings, these cats have had the guitar
down cold for a long time. TCH is the perfection of organic
experimentation. Chromakey Dreamcoat and Hey Saturday Sun are
examples as such. Even the crunchy "squeaks" from the guitar strings
are sampled to the point of being part of the beat sequence. The
guitar riffs on Chromakey are so deconstructed, that they sound more
like a Japanese shamisen rather than the former instrument. You can
listen to this song forever and that’s why Boards slams the brakes on
this song at the end, snapping you out of a surreal hypnosis. It is
already a fact that Boards have been influenced by psychedlic acts
like The Incredible String Band. The Band’s flutes and guitars have
been sampled by Boards on Geogaddi and before.

Those who dismiss this work as inferior to MHTRTC have completely
missed the point. Listen. Everyone, mark my lips…There will NEVER
EVER be another album like MHTRTC! There I said it. Just like there
will never be another Michael Jordan, Malcom X, Nikola Tesla or Jimi
Hendrix, we will never see another BOC album like Music…so stop
wishing for it. Everything Boards cranks out to the public is equally
beautiful in thankfully different ways. Their sound is evolving at an
exponential basis, drawing ideas and motifs from their previous works
and transmuting them into newer, greater and more complex
masterpieces. I’m not surprised that BOC needs months to work on one
song…and years just to make one full length CD. That’s how insanely
layered their music is. I never trust any artist that jams out a CD
of new material every year containing crap that fans want to hear.
True artists make music for solely themselves. If he or she gets a
couple of fans along the way, all the better. Artists are also
idiosyncratically selfish because they are dissatisfied with the
current paradigm of their genre’s art. They naturally crave to create
something that is self-authored, bringing the satisfaction of
creating something intimate and beautiful. BOC are just hitting the
3rd gear on their supercharged Minimoogs. I predict based on their
musical progression that there will be two more full albums before
they call it quits forever. The next album will highlight middle-aged
life and be released around 2008-2009 and their final album will face
old age, death and the transition around 2012. The circle will be
complete, or is it the "Hexagon"?

This is my longest review and I hope you survived it. If I bored you
to tears and you hate my review, so be it; that is your right. If
reading this made you a better Boards of Canada fan, then let’s go
"Happy Cycling" together. This is a great album and it will take me
until the next album to fully understand it. We can no longer call
Boards of Canada "electronic" artists. They are in a unique category
with no equal, but with many wannabees. "Analog-Synthetic Musical
Digitalization and Enhancement" is the closest ‘genre’ I can think of
for Boards of Canada, a coy, brilliant duo that now belongs to no
genre. 5 stars once again, Mike and Marcus. Don’t stop making music
for yourselves and thank you for another incredible journey in my
headphones.